Where did the time go? Timeboxing — What, Why and How to make space for the important things

Photo by Karla Hernandez on Unsplash
  • I can’t decide what to do first, so I start at the top of the list and work my way down
  • There isn’t enough time to fit it all in
  • The pings, dings and rings distracted me
  • I avoid the ‘necessary yet complex’ tasks and focus on the ‘easy to do’
  1. Decide on the task/s to Timebox. Small tasks such as sending an email can be Timeboxed as well as larger activities, such as building a website.
  2. Set the goal for each Timeboxed activity — this will move you from ticking things off a list to edging closer towards your goals
  3. Allocate the time each task will take to complete and add them to your schedule
  4. Do the work at the allocated start time and stop at the finish time.
  5. Review progress and adjust Timeboxing schedule for the future
Photo by Brett Jordan on Unsplash
  1. Increased Control– Timeboxing enables you to feel in control over how you spend your time. You have the agency to set the pace. How refreshing is that!
  2. Increased Productivity — By replying to emails for 30 minutes at the end of the day as opposed to over 60 minutes throughout the day, the productivity level has doubled.
  3. Detailed record of your accomplishments –performance reviews are made easier as your calendar full of Timeboxed activities helps answer the question of ‘what did I achieve?’
  4. Perfectionism — the time constraint that Timeboxing provides means that less time is wasted striving for that elusive perfect score.
  5. You can prioritise the things that matter
  1. Break down larger tasks into sub-tasks to be Timeboxed
  2. Start small, you don’t have to timebox every day. Perhaps start with one day per week
  3. Track your time to improve your estimation. Planning Fallacy states that we humans are bad estimators. We tend to be over-optimistic when judging how long something will take. The best way to overcome this is to track your time.
  4. Take breaks in between Timeboxes. The Pomodoro time management method recommends 25-minute chunks followed by 5-minute breaks. Other recommendations suggest 45 minutes per Timebox followed by 15 minutes break. The important thing is to take breaks and find a what works for you.
  5. Celebrate successful Timebox sessions. On occasions where the goal was not met, show self-compassion. The trick is to put your scientist hat on and investigate why some sessions went well and why others did not

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LMFnetwork

LMFnetwork

Bridging the skills gap and changing the narrative of inclusion! Global social enterprise and not for profit. 35K + Following; Community, Mentoring + Workshops!

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